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Top ways to keep water out of your diesel

By Steve Hinds, Senior Business Development Manager, CHS Refined Fuels Marketing from the Cenexperts blog

diesel powered tractor in a corn field

Incompatible people are often said to mix like oil and water. But if you really want to talk about an unfortunate combination, look no further than fuel and water. Water in a machine’s fuel line can be a one-way ticket to trouble.

The good news about water damage is it’s preventable. Here’s what you need to know about diesel fuel water contamination and how to keep it from sinking your operation.

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Ready for Change

By Annette Bertelsen, from Spring 2019 C magazine

What happens when the world’s biggest buyer suddenly backs away from U.S. soybeans? That’s been a question on everyone’s mind since July 6, 2018, when the United States implemented China-specific tariffs. The move embroiled U.S. farmers and cooperatives in a trade war that hit the soybean world particularly hard. Spring USDA data shows 2018–2019 soybean export inspections down nearly 34 percent from the year before, with farms and cooperatives struggling to handle huge carryover and reduced cash flow.

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You are invited to the 2019 CHS Owners Forums

register for a 2019 owners forum

The 2019 CHS Owners Forums will be held at 11 sites across the country in May and June. As an owner of CHS, we invite you to join us at the forum nearest you to hear business updates from CHS leadership including CHS President and CEO Jay Debertin. We will also take a look at industry trends and will be asking for your input on how we can make connections that support long-term success. Forums will wrap up with lunch at noon. Please register to reserve your spot.

Check for underground utilities before digging

Whether your spring to-do list includes building a fence or planting trees – breaking ground should always be done with caution. April is National Safe Digging Month so remember, your best line of defense before digging is to call 811, a free service that marks underground utilities and pipelines. Many of these are less than a foot underground. 

The process is simple: Call 811 or visit clickbeforeyoudig.com three days before a digging project, wait for underground utilities to be marked and don’t dig within two feet of those markers.  

digging

It’s best to call 811 any time you break ground, even if you think you know where a utility line is located. “In the U.S., an underground utility is hit every nine minutes, causing dangerous consequences,” says Tina Beach, public awareness specialist for CHS. “It takes a lifetime to build a farm, and it takes just one free call to keep it safe.”  

3 equipment tips to get the most out of a short planting season

Planting Equipment Tips

By Mimi Falkman, senior marketing specialist, CHS Lubricants

Planting season is always a busy time of year on the farm, but it can be especially tight when winter overstays its welcome. A short spring means there’s even less time than usual for farmers to complete some of the most important work of the year.

During a condensed planting season, equipment is under added stress because it needs to work overtime to meet demands. To keep machines protected and operating at peak performance during a shorter spring, farmers can set themselves up for success by preparing their equipment and fluids while the fields are still wet.

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CHS reports $596.3 million of net income for first six months of fiscal 2019

CHS Income

CHS Inc. reported net income of $248.8 million for the second quarter of fiscal 2019 and $596.3 million for the first six months of fiscal 2019.

“Our strong performance in the second quarter reflects our hard work at serving our owners and other customers better. We’ve refocused on serving our customers and improving our operations, and that has shown positive results in our financials for the first half of fiscal 2019,” said Jay Debertin, CHS president and chief executive officer. “Our performance also reflects the benefit of a diverse platform across business units that serves our cooperative and farmer-owners.”

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Recognize, respect risks associated with grain handling

Grain powers American agriculture. During Stand-Up for Grain Safety Week, March 25 through 29, we want to remind everyone working on farms and in grain-handling facilities to respect and understand the risks associated with working with grain.

“It’s important to continue to work with the industry, our employees and our farmer-owners on the hazards in the grain industry, while stressing safe practices and controls to ensure their safety,” says Matt Surdick, manager, Country Operations Environment, Health and Safety, CHS.

Stand-Up for Grain Safety Week was organized by the National Grain and Feed Association (NGFA), the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the Grain Elevator and Processing Society, the American Feed Industry Association and the Grain Handling Safety Coalition.

The groups remind us to remember five steps to grain safety:

  • Never walk down grain
  • Guard elevated work surfaces
  • Watch for moving equipment
  • Safeguard moving equipment
  • Lock out equipment

Moving or flowing grain acts like quicksand and can bury a person in seconds. From the time an auger starts, a person has two to three seconds to react. In four to five seconds, a person is trapped. In 22 seconds or less, the person is completely covered by grain. Grain bin incidents often result in multiple fatalities because coworkers improperly attempt rescue procedures and become engulfed themselves.

“Following procedures, evaluating your surroundings, using proper equipment and ensuring constant communication are keys to entering and exiting a grain bin or silo safely,” Surdick says. “Do it the right way, every time.”

Be aware of bridging grain, which occurs when grain clumps together due to moisture or mold. These conditions can create an empty space beneath the grain as it is unloaded, which means it can collapse unexpectedly or under a person’s weight. Do not enter a bin when there is a bridging condition, or if grain is built up on the side of the bin.

Always monitor the atmosphere inside bins for dangerous changes. Make sure there two people are always present when working in bins and maintain communications between the attendant outside the bin and the person inside the bin.

Never move grain into or out of a bin while someone is inside. Lockout/tagout all mechanical, electrical, hydraulic and pneumatic equipment that presents a danger, particularly grain-moving equipment.

A bin of grain may seem harmless, but in just seconds, that harmless grain can claim a life. Please be safe and share these messages with anyone working with grain.

It Takes Talent to Feed the World

By Nanci Lilja, President, CHS Foundation

When most people think of agriculture, they wonder how we are going to feed the growing population of 9.6 billion by 2050. And while that’s an important question to consider, I find myself thinking more often about the individuals needed to fill the talent pipeline to feed that growing population.

With nearly 4 in 10 agriculture jobs going unfilled each year and the average-age of farmers ever increasing, it’s going to take a pragmatic, creative approach to encourage young people to pursue careers in agriculture.

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© 2019 CHS Inc.